Helpful Information and Links

Patient Glossary

Radiculopathy
A "pinched nerve" refers to nerve compression that can be a result of a bulging or herniated ("slipped") disk. Radicular pain is the pain that radiates into the arm or leg and is often described as an "electrical" or "burning" feeling. These symptoms can be constant or intermittent and can vary in intesntiy.
Pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and muscle spasm are almost always present with radiculopathy.


Myofascial Pain
Aching pain in muscles and connective tissue is myofascial pain. It can also be associated with repetitive microtraumas such as poor posture, sitting at a computer or other job-related tasks. Patients can experience myofascial pain in various parts of the body, such as the neck, arms, back or legs. Some patients report difficulty sleeping or maintaining a prolonged position due to muscle fatigue.

Spinal Stenosis
Stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal and/or foramen, the openings between each vertebral level, through which the nerve roots exit the central canal and travel throughout the body. A narrowing of the foramen can cause problems similar to a "pinched nerve." Cervical stenosis produces pain in the neck and/or upper extremities. This can result in decreased grip strength or numb hands. Lumbar stenosis can cause back and/or lower extremities. This can result in difficulty walking, standing, and sitting.

Tendon, Ligament and Soft Tissue Pain
Localized pain that occurs when an area is stretched, torn or overused. The result is tenderness, limited range of motion, inflammation, and/or weakness.

Repetitive Strain Injury
An injury that occurs from a chronically used part of the body, either in a normal or abnormal way. These problems are often found in people who perform repetitive activities in their daily routine.

Helpful Links

The American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

PASSOR

American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

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